Intelligence management

Intelligence products

There are four products which are the deliverables of intelligence-led policing. They are the result of collaboration between analysts, intelligence officers and policing units. Each product has a defined purpose, and provides recommendations for making decisions and options for action.

Strategic assessment

This gives an overview of the current and long-term issues affecting or likely to affect a force or basic command unit. It should be used to draw inferences and make recommendations for prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance priorities, and future policing strategy. The strategic assessment is an integral part of the business planning process and is created to:

The strategic assessment is a living document that is current and relevant. Information collection and analysis in support of the assessment must be ongoing and include problem profiles, trends and developments. Opportunities for public consultation should also be considered.

A range of staff and partners should be involved in the production of the strategic assessment. Their knowledge and expertise will improve recommendations, and lead to better decision making.

Content of the strategic assessment

The strategic assessment should be based on the research and analysis of a wide range of internal and external information sources. The following should be considered:

  • government security classification (GSC) marking
  • detail on the information sources and method used in compiling the report
  • general picture of current policing issues, with consideration given to local and national priorities
  • key threats against the control strategy and emerging issues, which may include:
    • performance against objectives
    • analysis of crime or incident levels
    • public perception of the issue
    • emerging trends
    • examination of political, economic, social, technological, environmental, legal, organisational and media (PESTELOM) factors
    • recommendations
  • prioritisation of identified issues.

Tactical assessment

The tactical assessment is used to identify the short-term issues for consideration by the tactical tasking and coordination group (TT&CG). It should be used to draw inferences and make recommendations for prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance priorities, and future policing activity. A tactical assessment is created to:

  • define problems and identify subjects
  • recommend tactical options
  • review intelligence requirements
  • review recent performance and actions set at previous meetings
  • identify emerging patterns and trends.

Information collection and analysis to support the assessment must be ongoing and include problem profiles, subject profiles, trends and developments. Production of the tactical assessment should involve a range of staff and partners whose knowledge and expertise will improve recommendations and lead to better decision making.

Content of the tactical assessment

The tactical assessment should not be restricted to police information on criminal activity and criminals. It needs to be based on the research and analysis of a wide range of information sources, including organised crime group mapping (OCGM) and external information. Consider including the following:

  • GSC marking
  • detail on the information sources and method used in compiling the report
  • overview of the crime and incident picture since the last tactical tasking and coordination group
  • predictions and emerging issues for the next reporting period
  • progress and performance against current priorities
  • key dates for planning
  • recommendations for prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance activity.

Subject profile

These are usually commissioned by the tactical tasking and coordination group to provide a detailed report of a suspect(s) or victim(s). Each profile has an assigned owner and is added to and updated until the subject is apprehended or protected. Subject profiles may also be commissioned by a senior investigating officer to assist investigations during a major or serious crime inquiry, or an intelligence manager to aid research.

A subject profile is created to:

  • assist in prioritisation
  • identify intelligence gaps
  • highlight prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance opportunities
  • provide justification for actions.

Justification for the selection of subjects and the tactics deployed must comply with the principles contained in the Human Rights Act 1998.

Subject profiles should be stored centrally to enable information to be retrieved if necessary.

Content of the subject profile

The subject profile should be based on the research and analysis of a wide range of information sources (closed/open), including OCGM and external information. It should have the appropriate GSC marking, and comprise the following categories.

Summary and authorisation – content may include:

  • date and version control
  • reasons or justification for targeting subject.

Personal record – content may include:

  • family and relationships
  • lifestyle and habits
  • employment details
  • criminal record details
  • financial profile
  • links to OCGM data.

Subject profile analysis – content may:

  • provide information, based on analysis, to develop prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance recommendations
  • predict both criminal activity and/or impact or vulnerability of the victim
  • highlight potential new sources of information
  • assess the threat or risk to the subject.

Prevention, intelligence collection, enforcement and reassurance plans.

Risk assessment which identifies the effect of a range of impact factors and suggests actions to counter or minimise them.

Problem profile

These are usually commissioned by the tasking and coordination group (T&CG) to provide a greater understanding of established and emerging crime or incident series, priority locations or other identified high-risk issues. The T&CG commissions the development of problem profiles and allocates specific owners to them. Problem profiles may also be commissioned by an intelligence manager to aid research.

A problem profile is created to:

  • provide detail on crime trends or hot spots that require greater analysis than can be provided in the tactical assessment
  • provide a vehicle for the application of one or more analytical techniques to a problem
  • assist in subject identification and selection (suspects or victims)
  • assist in prioritisation
  • identify intelligence gaps
  • highlight prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance opportunities
  • provide justification for actions.

The problem profile must be current and relevant. It should be added to and updated until the problem is dealt with, then stored for retrieval if necessary.

Content of the problem profile

The profile varies according to the nature and significance of the problem. It should be based on the research and analysis of a wide range of information sources, including OCGM and external information. It should have the appropriate GPMS marking, and comprise the following categories.

Summary and authorisation – content may include:

  • date and version control
  • justification for targeting including tests of proportionality and necessity
  • reasons for targeting hot spot, series or priority location.

Problem profile analysis – content may:

  • answer Who? What? When? Where? Why? How?
  • assist in the prioritisation of problems
  • provide information, based on analysis, to develop prevention, intelligence, enforcement and reassurance recommendations
  • predict the evolution or pattern of a problem
  • highlight potential new sources of information
  • assess any threat or risk posed by the problem
  • identify whether the problem occurs cross-border.

Prevention, intelligence collection, enforcement and reassurance plans.

Risk assessment which identifies the effect of a range of impact factors and suggests actions to counter or minimise them.

Page last accessed 18 November 2017